Call for Abstracts 2025

Abstract Submission

River Restoration Northwest is dedicated to convening diverse perspectives in the river restoration community.

As the summer season begins, February may feel far off but it’s already that time again to start planning for the 23rd RRNW Symposium – February 4-7, 2025.

We are accepting abstracts and sessions proposals starting today and look forward to reading about the exciting work you all want to share!

If you have questions, please contact symposium@rrnw.org.

Suggested Topics

  • The Human Element - Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), community, and social considerations
    Most humans do not understand their inherent reliance on functioning ecosystems and fluvial systems. Although we have the ability to adapt our local environment to directly increase our own habitat suitability, we often fall short in creating conditions that allow us to live in harmony with nature. As watershed stewards, how do we better integrate human and societal needs in the ecosphere? Can river restoration be used to successfully help reverse social injustices? Do you have an example where the community was at the heart of a restoration project? How do we apply traditional ecological knowledge to create environments that sustainably balance the needs of rivers and our communities?

 

  • Turning the Mirage from Illusion to Reality - Arid Ecosystem Recovery and Dryland Restoration
    Roughly half of the Columbia River Basin is within an arid or semi-arid region, which poses significant challenges to salmon recovery because water is limited. Moreover, restoration funding is disproportionately allocated to the temperate rainforest region on the west side of the Cascade Mountains. Ultimately, if fish don’t have access to water then other limiting factors don’t matter. How does river restoration differ in water-limited systems? How do you establish robust riparian corridors in damaged systems receiving less than ten inches of precipitation annually? What strategies have you used to make the most of limited resources in the desert?

 

  • Remove the Wall! - Dam Removals
    A new wave of dam removals is bringing new life to riverine systems throughout the country. The largest dam removal effort in history is currently underway on the Klamath River, and there will be a dedicated session during the symposium to highlight that monumental effort. However, there are still over 600,000 miles of streams and rivers that are behind dams in the USA. Progress is being made and over 2,000 dams in the USA have been removed in the last 110 years, many of them small and overshadowed by larger projects. Do you have a story to tell about small dam removals in your local watershed? How do we scale up dam removal efforts to tackle the immense challenge of freeing rivers across the country, especially when modern society still depends on many of the remaining dams?

 

  • iRiver - Advancements in River Tech
    From stick and tape measurements during reach-scale surveys to landscape-scale remote sensing monitoring, river research has advanced tremendously in the last couple of decades. Moreover, a new generation of tech-savvy scientists is opening new doors to answer many of the research challenges our field has faced in the past. Even just five years ago, data acquisition using drones appeared promising and now it has become practically a requirement for assessment and design projects. How are you leveraging the most recent advancements in technology to advance river science? Have new technologies made our tasks easier or are they highlighting limiting factors we could not previously quantify? Are you nervous about the potential future reliance on artificial intelligence or do you have an example where the latest and greatest tech fad steered your project in the wrong direction?

 

  • The Nitty Gritty River Bend - Detailed analysis to inform restoration
    It is logistically and financially infeasible to sufficiently monitor every stretch of the river and every river restoration project. However, we are still inundated with countless additions to the literature highlighting detailed studies that have the potential to guide and improve future restoration practices. How do we compile and responsibly leverage the abundance of reference material across multiple watersheds? Have you completed a robust limiting factors analysis that altered restoration priorities in your region? Do you have a successful example of scaling results from small detailed studies to whole stream segments or watersheds?

 

DeadlinesInstructionsSelection Criteria

Deadline for Oral/Poster Presentation Abstracts Submissions

Session submissions are due August 1, 2024.
A
bstract submissions are due September 1, 2024.
Complying with all of these instructions must be received via online submission by 11:59:00 PM PST. Note that incomplete abstracts will not be considered for acceptance

Instructions

Submissions will only be received electronically, via our online system.

No more than two (2) submissions per person (i.e. Convener, Lead Author, and/or Presenter)

Submissions must not be:

    • autobiographical;
    • commercial/promotional;

Oral/Poster Presentation Abstracts

RRNW session format generally consists of three or four oral presentations that build upon a common theme. Sessions are presented in a plenary format to an audience of 300-400. Presentations should appeal to a broad audience.

The number of accepted oral presentations is limited by our commitment to a plenary format. Therefore, abstract screening is rigorous and competitive. Authors must indicate during the submittal process if they wish to be considered for Oral only, Poster only, or either format.

  • Selecting Oral only will result in your abstract will be considered for an oral presentation only.
  • Selecting Poster Only will result in your abstract being considered for a poster presentation only.
  • Selecting either format will result in your abstract being reviewed first as a candidate for an oral presentation, and if not selected it will be considered as a candidate for a poster presentation.

Authors will be notified of acceptance after the review process is complete.

  1. Oral presentations are 20 minutes in duration, this includes 5 minutes for audience questions and responses. Oral presentations are grouped into sessions of three to four based on content. Due to limited duration, only one presenter is allowed per presentation.
  2. Poster presentations are highly valued and encouraged, as they allow extended interaction between authors and symposium participants. Posters are displayed for a full day with an active poster session duration of two hours. Poster authors are expected to be present at their poster exhibit during the poster session. Poster presenters may also elect to provide a 3 minute “lightning talk” presentation during the plenary session.
  3. Posters are to be traditional large-format hard copy displays. Accepted posters are displayed for a full day; the active poster session will be two hours long, and introduced during the plenary session by the RRNW Poster Moderator. Authors of selected posters are required to submit an electronic introductory slide to the moderator prior to the Symposium for use in the introductory presentation.
  4. Poster authors are expected to be present at their exhibit station during the poster session.
  5. Detailed format guidelines and restrictions applying to the Oral presentations and Poster presentations will be provided to all authors after notification of acceptance.
  6.  All accepted presenters are required to register for the symposium and attend the symposium

See examples of previously accepted session proposal here:


Selection Criteria

All submissions are subject to review by the program committee, comprised of RRNW Board of Directors. The program committee will review all submissions based on the following:

Relevance to River Restoration The extent to which the abstract addresses key issues, challenges, or advancements in river restoration.

Impacts and Applications – The potential impact of the research or project on river restoration practices, policies, or broader environmental and social outcomes.

Innovation and Originality – The novelty of the research or project, including new techniques, ideas, or approaches to river restoration.

Clarity and Coherence – The clarity with which the abstract is written, including the organization of ideas, coherence of arguments, and overall readability.

Community Engagement and Involvement The extent to which the abstract involves project partners, including local communities, policymakers, and other relevant groups, in the research or project.

Thank you for your interest in presenting at RRNW’s Annual Stream Restoration Symposium. If you have questions, please contact symposium@rrnw.org.

Evaluation of submissions may result in decisions to merge or otherwise adjust proposed sessions. RRNW reserves the right to cancel an accepted session if an insufficient number of proposed presentation abstracts are accepted.

All program participants are required to register for the Symposium.

Examples of previously accepted session proposal abstracts provided here

Session Proposals must be completed and received by 11:59 PM PST on Tuesday August 1, 2023.

RRNW session format generally consists of three or four oral presentations that build upon a common theme. Sessions are presented in a plenary format to an audience of 300-400.

Session Conveners are to propose a session theme, provide a session abstract describing the proposed theme, and list 3 or 4 oral presentations that support the proposed theme. Presentation topics should acknowledge the range of discipline and perspective among the river restoration community. The program committee may decline to consider session proposals that lack this organization and focus.

Session proposals will be screened for completeness, ranked through a transparent process, and decisions made at least two weeks ahead of the deadline for presentation abstract submissions. Conveners will be notified of session acceptance and are expected to ensure that all proposed presentation abstracts are submitted on time.

Acceptance of a session proposal does not ensure that all presentation abstracts proposed for the session will be accepted. Conveners must work with their presenters to ensure abstract submissions are strong and meet requirements. Each presentation abstract is subject to individual review and ranking, and will be selected on its own merit.

Call for Session Proposals

The Deadline for Session Proposals, Oral Abstracts, and poster abstracts has passed.

DeadlinesInstructionsSelection Criteria

Deadline for Session Proposal Submission

Session Proposals complying with all of these instructions must be received via online submission by 3:00 PM PST on Tuesday July 13, 2021.

Instructions

Submissions will only be received electronically.

No more than two (2) submissions per person (i.e. convener, lead author, and/or presenter).

Submissions must not be:

  • autobiographical;
  • commercial/promotional;

Session Proposals

RRNW session format generally consists of three or four oral presentations that build upon a common theme. Sessions are presented in a plenary format to an audience of 300-400. Presentation should appeal to a broad audience.

Session Conveners are to propose a session theme, provide an abstract describing the proposed theme, and list 3 or 4 oral presentations that support the proposed theme. Presentation topics should acknowledge the range of discipline and perspective among the river restoration community. The program committee may decline to consider session proposals that lack this organization and focus.

Session proposals will be screened for completeness and ranked with decisions made at least two weeks ahead of the deadline for oral abstract submissions. Conveners will be notified of session acceptance and are expected to ensure that all proposed presentation abstracts are submitted on time.

Acceptance of a session proposal does not ensure that all presentation abstracts proposed for the session will be accepted. Conveners must work with their presenters to ensure abstract submissions are strong and meet requirements. Each presentation abstract is subject to individual review and ranking, and will be selected on its own merit.

Evaluation of submissions may result in decisions to merge or otherwise adjust proposed sessions. RRNW reserves the right to cancel an accepted session if an insufficient number of proposed presentations are accepted.

All program participants are required to register for the symposium by January 1, 2022.

See examples of previously accepted session proposal here:

Session Selection Criteria

All submissions are subject to review by the program committee, comprised of the RRNW Board of Directors. The program committee will review all submissions based on the following:

Relevance - to river restoration science and of interest to range of disciplines.

Contribution - to advancement of the science and practice of river restoration.

Originality - to provoke fruitful debate and discussion in the audience.

Creativity – as stimulus for plenary session audience interaction.

Rigor - (esp. for case studies) in approach and monitoring data to support conclusions.

Organization – (for Session Proposals only) with sufficient focus, detail,  and variety of component presentations.